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The Peacock

HallowMass Destruction part Three


Ridgefield Asylum for the Criminally Insane


"Mister Donahue, it is so nice to see you again! They told me you wanted to have a look at our investigation into Jack O Lantern's escape."

Director Kensington had the most ingenious smile a woman could muster. She was not long for this job and would be the 32nd Director to be 'resigned'
in just over two years. Two former male directors were now locked within and  five females were now residents at Hanover. The job seemed to really break and twist the minds of even the most capable and brilliant to become psychopathic murderers themselves.

"I need to take more of a hand in this place. Its not that I don't trust the work you all do here its just serving the community requires more than me just signing off checks."

Matt put on a disarming face, inside he was steaming mad. How the hell did they have so many escapes? Maybe a metahuman team needed to be added to the staff,
like they had at Hanover.

"I can show you all the files and the current results of our investigation.."

Matt cut her off deftly. "Thats fine, but I would like to see his cell."

Director Kensington was dismayed at this suggestion and it showed in her face. Soon the smile that could blind returned.

"Okay, then. Come with me."


Matt Donahue looked inside the padded cell which had been left the way it was while the investigation commenced. He  both ignored the ranting from the other inmates on the floor and the two
large male guards armed to the teeth.

There was writing all over the walls with a water soluble marker. This was a common technique at both asylums as it gave the patient a focus and had a calming effect. Usually straitjacketed, a patient
could still use their feet or mouth. The effort required extra concentration and helped the calming. It also helped give insights into the patient.

The writing on the walls had rambled ideas, names, locations. Like brainstorming for an idea, the beginnings of a script or screenplay.

"We gave him a note pad and he was quiet for a number of days. However when we would take it from him, he would have a fit. He took the notepad with him when he escaped
but  the writing on the wall was another story." One of the guards explained.

The writing on the wall was chaotic and after a few minutes, Matt seemed stymied. Jack O lantern wanted to film a horror movie with kidnapped important people from Nefcon City.
But there was nothing recognizable to work with, no concept or name that could be a clue. Matt had enjoyed horror films during his youth but that soon lost appeal upon his teenage years.
There were only so many ideas and tropes in a horror movie so he was hoping maybe for an angle, something to figure out this maniac's next move.

He then heard whistling from the cell next door. A tune that seemed familiar somewhat…

Matt walked over to the neighboring cell window. Markkus, the Nosferatu wannabe. It sooner dawned on Matt that the more macabre styled patients were on this floor. Cthulhu Kid was yelling out some strange language.
Meatrack was pacing back and forth staring out the window of his cell at Matt and then pacing again. The Roach said nothing as usual and was lying under his cot in the darkness.

Matt looked in on the vampire like villain, one who had almost killed him more than once. He was hanging upside down with his feet on a kind of harness and was whistling that strange tune. His eyes were closed.


"I want to speak with him."

The two guards looked at him and then each other. They seemed almost afraid.

"Lets call backup."


"Oh its a tune I picked up from my neighbor..the living pumpkin. He hummed it and it was quite catchy, a modernist style composition. Minimalist." Markkus smiled, he loved to show off his knowledge of avant grade  things. An uber Goth
going to a murderous conclusion.

"I think its from a movie." Matt added. "You any Idea?"

Markkus looked at him with a scowl. "If I help you do I get anything out of it?"

"Well you are getting help for your condition are you not?" Matt began the 'negotiation'


"You know what I mean, you nietzschean blonde beast.." Markkus motioned to his straitjacket sleeves.


"Well I can put in a good word for you, but you need to stop trying to kill the nurses here." Matt retorted.

"I wasn't going to hurt them bad, I just needed a little blood. Just a little.." Markkus had an almost mischievous smile.


"The movie its from, I know you are a horror film aficionado."

"Oh I was, but now I only watch silent films. If its before 1929, forget it. I have standards."

Matt turned to leave.

"I knew you wouldn't know. I'm leaving." Matt got turned to leave and motioned to the guards.


"Wait..let me think..it has been a while."

"Oh?" Matt turned to look at Markkus. He rarely lied to be fair which was unusual for most of his rogue's gallery.


"The one with the doctor. Where he planned to get revenge on the people who saved his life after being burned but was unable to fix his face.."

"There's a million ones like that. Be more specific.." Matt egged him on.

"Quiet! I'm trying to think"..Markkus closed his eyes and began to pace in his cell, looking frustrated. At one point the ranting of Cthulhu Kid aggravated him and he yelled at him to shut up!


"Doctor Malfactorium…that one. 1953. Known for its graphic violence for the time, a man's face melting. A burning wig put on a woman's head. I think it was an italian film they dubbed."

Markkus looked quite satisfied. Matt had got what he wanted.

"Thank you, Markkus." Matt smiled.

"Remember our deal, get me out of this. It looks cool in a goth club but it gets old after a couple of days." Markkus complained about his straitjacket.

"I will remember." Matt walked out as the door was closed behind him.

"How about one in black leather!!!" Markkus shouted from inside. "If I have to be here, I want to look as cool as possible!!"


Matt instead recommended more ECT for Markkus to the director. Leaving in his limo he smiled at how such a thing would have racked him with guilt before. He was becoming more
corrupt and he did not care!"

"Well? You get anything?" Carl asked as he drove back to the Donahue Estate. "I was disappointed, all the boys were in isolation, sigh.."

"Doctor Malfactorium..we have to download an obscure horror film, Carl. Looks like tonight is a movie night."

"Oh goodie!! Let me stop at the local Nefmart and get some popcorn and chips."

"Yes, see if they have the caviar flavored chips, those are my favorite."

The limo turned into a Nefmart parking lot on the edge of the county.



An(yet another) abandoned church located twenty miles out of the Nefcon City limits.


Jack O lantern watched over his henchmen who were designing some sort of set.

"I wuz hired to knock skulls and break legs not make fake dungeon walls outta wood!" A disgruntled Henchman in a pumpkin costume grumbled.

"Shhh!! Shut up, don't let them hear ya!" Another henchman retorted.

"I'm not afraid of dat Pumpkinhead, he don't look tough, he looks ridiculous!"

His buddy whispered to him in desperation. "Forget him..the two broads!!!"

"Those skinny weirdoes with the black eyes? I don't care if they're Hanover girls, I ain't scared of two dames who dress like candy corn!"

His friend did not respond. He was instead looking behind his grousing partner in crime and his eyes showed true terror.

"Huh?" The henchmen turned around to see the two women he was mocking behind them. He began to sweat profusely.

"I..I was talking about somebody else..those Three Amigas, yeah..heh..working for them got me locked up in a five year bid in the joint..I wuz talkin about them, I swear."

The two said nothing.

Soon the screams of the henchman were heard reverberating through the church. The other Henchmen looked for a few seconds and what was happening to him and then with sweat dripping down their faces went back to their work with
a furious focus.

Jack O Lantern smiled. "Good work, Ladies! We know have at least three extra realistic looking corpse props now!"


"Don't.."Orange started.


..mention it!" Yellow finished.

The two women smiled briefly, which was rare.

"Yes, soon..my cinematic masterpiece will take the world of crime and horror by storm! My homage to the Doctor Malfactorium series!! AHAHAHAHAHAHAH!!!"


The Candy Corn twins and Jack O Lantern began to laugh maniacally. The Henchmen were quiet and continued their work. In the back of their minds they hope they would not be "extras".

To Be Continued
Been having some problems with things but my spirit is good..autumn always saves me.

Anyway, I am going to try and post horror movie reviews every day till Oct 31. Why when I subscribe to the old Ministry song 'Everday is Halloween'? The truth is that the cooler weather and wet and windy grey skies along with the fallen leaves seems to soothe my 'calvinist/pagan' death consciousness. I am going to try and post reviews even on my long 16hr days so I may outline them beforehand.

As I get older, the horror genre has not lessened as a favorite but in fact is more and more relevant to my mind and soul. Many people creatively return over and over again to Edgar Allen Poe for a good reason. Being too specific with the supernatural is fun and has a place, but as one gets older the uncertainty and real life horrors become more and more real. As long as there are a people who still have a sense of the tragic and of the classics of the West, the gothic tradition will always hold a power. This may become extinct over the next century, what is confused as darkness may be actually the last ember of a dying civilization.

The Raven (1935)

Starring Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff

   Once again, like The Black Cat, this is a film whose inspiration is 'suggested by the Edgar Allen Poe classic'. In this case the famous Poem 'The Raven'. The movie actually is more relevant to 
Poe than The Black Cat in that it is influenced explicitly by Poe.

Lugosi plays a brilliant and deranged doctor who is such an aficionado of Poe that he has built a simulated dungeon under his estate and has a stuffed Raven in his study (I want a study like that, even if I live in a trailer I will make a faux one) whose shadow ominously projects itself on the wall.

He saves the life of a beautiful woman, whose father is the local judge. But then his obsession with her causes the Judge to tell Lugosi to stay away from her. I understand the sentiment, but to say it is the height of ingratitude is enough to almost make Lugosi justified in this. He swears revenge and then decides to get some help in the form of escaped criminal Boris Karloff. Karloff wants him to change his face to avoid detection from the authorities. Lugosi changes his face alright(Yuck!) and soon uses him as a pawn to put Poe's imaginary devices from his stories into actual use on those who wronged him!

The movie has alot of really nice touches. A dark and stormy night. A dungeon with a pit and a pendulum. A room with walls that crush its victims and even a room that goes up and down like an elevator. Lugosi reciting Poe and near the end crying "Poe is Avenged!!!" with his accent is
classic horror perfection. Karloff's character is basically the inspiration for a certain Batman villain we all know (he likes to flip a coin) and the scene where he sees the 'new face' Lugosi 
gave him is quite shocking. Lugosi is absolutely batshit insane in this, smiling like a true madman. Once again the early horror film era is a huge influence on Batman's imagery, where I to ever write Batman, the gothic horror element would predominate..not gritty modern serial killer or alt timelines with vampires. 

Once again the 'heroes' are zeros and other than the quite attractive heroine (who does interpretive dance based on Poe!), I would have preferred Lugosi finished them off but hey, crime does not pay! There is a nice humorous touch at the end with an older couple showing what they are doing while the others are fighting for their lives.

While the consensus is that The Black Cat is superior, I enjoy The Raven equally.


The Raven (1964)
Directed by Roger Corman, written by Richard Matheson
Starring Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Boris Karloff and a young punk ass Jack Nicholson.

Once again the connection to Poe is a wraparound piece with Vince reciting the classic poem and then realizing the Raven he sees is actually talking to him..and the bird is a real jerk! Roger Corman and Richard Matheson come through again with an unlikely Poe adaption. After all the grim tales of madness and torture, we get something lighter to digest.

This film is essentially a supernatural comedy with renaissance era sorcerers fighting each other.
The Raven turns out to be a sorcerer (lorre) defeated by an evil one(karloff) and turned into a bird. Vince helps him and then discovers his late former love (Lenore, duh) is a prisoner and is compelled to confront him. Also tagging along is Lorre's simple minded son, a young Jack Nicholson. Of course Nicholson was the son of one of the AIP producers..


This is a fun film and the old timers are amazing. A dying Peter Lorre looks like hell but gives it his all as possibly the most obnoxious character in a move ever, drinking whatever alcohol he can get his hands on when not yelling at everyone and trying to pick fights. Vincent plays a slightly fey younger sorcerer who seems like a wimp but actually is quite powerful when his daughter is threatened. Karloff is a charming old wizard who is quite sinister (but as it turns out a bit henpecked!). Seeing a young Jack Nicholson in the midst of these old masters is surreal in its self and he actually does a great job. I am not a fan of Nicholson but even his constant evil and intense psycho persona has yielded some good results like The Shining.

Also well done is the battle at the end. A very impressive use of lights, animation and matte shots to create a surreal, clever and comical battle between Price and Karloff. All the crazy hong kong movies of the 80's and 90's had to have been influenced by this.(A scene in John Carpenter's
classic Big Trouble in Little China is obviously inspired by this scene).

Also a mention has to be given to late Richard Matheson. This man wrote so many stories, novels and screenplays that influenced modern horror, sci fi, thrillers, etc. He was truly one of the most talented and imaginative writers who ever existed, straddling the mid 20th century when many things once thought fantastical were coming true. His ability to deal with the human element, of how mankind would deal and adapt to all sorts of situations is one of his strengths.

Once again, all hail the masters! The dark themes of their work may dialectically light the way into the new coming dark age, to fight against destiny and fate itself!


Also, here is a great pre Code 50's horror comic style pic from :iconj-cole:!
Bark at the moon by J-Cole

Now I feel the Halloween spirit!
Once again I do a dual review, one of a classic horror film and then one newer one that was overlooked although in this case maybe I overlooked it since a sequel is coming for it.
This being  remake of the 1973 George Romero flick, The Crazies.

The Crazies (2010)

..I am someone who should hate remakes because they usually mean that Hollywood does not have a new idea. However with Horror its a little different. There were many remakes within just the few couple of decades of cinema starting. Talkie remakes of silent classics, and even remakes in the 1980's that were effective like Invasion of the Body Snatchers and The Thing.

I caught a cut version of George Romero's The Crazies on television when I was a kid and am loathe to admit that I did not get to seeing it during the DVD revolution in the 90's/2000's which 
put the work of many horror directors (some already passed on) in a new critical light. In fact I had no desire to see this remake when it came out in 2010 and caught this on television of all places.

This remake is nothing too astounding but I really liked the major concept of the horror not even being the virus that turns people into psychopathic killers but rather the dual totalitarian and incompetence of the government in dealing with the outbreak.

Basically an army plane crashes with an experimental virus that turns people into murderous psychopaths, like a hyper rabies in a small town in the midwest. While the sheriff and his girlfriend try to figure out what is going on, the military comes in and goes all heavy handed on the populace, herding them into camps. Then all hell breaks loose and the military bails leaving the people to fend for themselves while killing and incinerating those they think are infected (whether they are or not) and even those that just resist.

One chilling scene is when a camp gets overrun and the military pigs leave a whole tent of infected people helplessly strapped to gurneys. Most are infected and ignored by a 'crazie' who comes in with a pitchfork but three women who were mistakenly tagged as infected are left to their fate (one of them being the hero's girlfriend). Two are saved but one is impaled with a pitchfork after begging for help. This scene is tough to watch because the the womans real killers were the failed men who left her behind.

As the situation spirals out of control, the government decides on a 'cleansing' option with a nuke..can the heroes (whats left of them) escape in time?

I am surprisingly not as anti military as I am antipolice (of course I am even more anti criminal so its all moot anyhow), and their is a scene where a sympathetic (and horrified) soldier does the right thing but overall that aspect of the film is what made it work as horror. The infected are actually not that impressive when compared to 28 Days later or other infected/zombie films.
Once again the real enemy is man himself.


The Phantom of the Opera (1925)
starring Lon Chaney

I have heard this described as the greatest silent horror film ever made and I am not inclined to disagree. In many ways this is not a true horror film and it is as big budget as Nosferatu was low budget. I have both movies on a split DVD I got for cheap a few years back.

The version I have is all black and white with some bad transfers on some of the reel but I have seen a remastered version with different color tints as well as the infamous early technicolor
scene at the Masquerade.

I have never read the book, so I am only going with this film.

An Opera house in 19th century Paris is haunted by a mysterious Phantom who takes a liking to an up and coming singer but who gets pissed if anyone else gets in the spotlight. One of the most infamous and shocking scenes is a giant chandelier being released on a full opera house full of people! The phantom is obviously a psychopathic killer but he is also a talented musical genius.

Basically this is like a mystery story with a disfigured villain who is like a prototype for Batmans Arkham rogues gallery(in the film he has escaped from an island asylum). And here is what has made this film immortal, the performance of the famous man of a thousand faces, Lon Chaney.

The unmasking scene is truly a shock and once again I can picture people back then gasping in terror at the reveal. Lon Chaney really put his face through torture to achieve a makeup job without any appliances or latex. He used devices to contort his face and the visage of the Phantom is still effective almost a century later. His pantomime is also effective, this evil genius 
is also quite tragic and you can feel his pain and rage at the world for forsaking him.

I can relate!

There are also many well shot scenes, like Chaney dressed as the Red Death (ala Poe) at a masquerade. Him lurking among a statue with his cape waving in the night (again the Batman creators had to be influenced!) with his face conveying despair at his 'beloved' forsaking him (beloved in his own twisted mind, the beautiful singer is terrified of him although she likes his
compositions).

This is an amazing film and put Universal on the map with its future horror/thrillers to come.
Unfortunately Lon Chaney was not to join their 1930's glory as he died of throat cancer in
1930. He was slated to play Dracula, which of course is the role that made Bela Lugosi a 
star. Lon's son, the hulking Lon Chaney Jr (a favorite of mine, a vulnerable and brawny actor)
went on to stardom in the 40's as the tragic Wolfman, maybe my favorite monster character.

On TCM I saw a segment with some hipster types lauding silent movies, and my gut reaction was of disdain but then I understood what they were doing. Silent movies are so removed and almost surreal from this modern time that any younger fans who can get into Silent films should be encouraged. This cinema is our history and from a time when the West still had some vitality although about to be smashed by world wars and cultural inversion. 

And in the end the silent film format as well as black and white (or sepia) is especially suited to the dreamlike and surreal qualities of horror films. I would like to see a Neo Silent revival in horror and that is suited to the no budget digital arena. 

deviantID

single-leg
United States
Current Residence: the declining Northeast USA
Favourite genre of music: Black metal, classic metal, Italian horror music prog rock, classic disco and rap.
Favourite style of art: Drawings..
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Personal Quote: Not ANOTHER stupid white guy commercial!?!!?
Interests
Been having some problems with things but my spirit is good..autumn always saves me.

Anyway, I am going to try and post horror movie reviews every day till Oct 31. Why when I subscribe to the old Ministry song 'Everday is Halloween'? The truth is that the cooler weather and wet and windy grey skies along with the fallen leaves seems to soothe my 'calvinist/pagan' death consciousness. I am going to try and post reviews even on my long 16hr days so I may outline them beforehand.

As I get older, the horror genre has not lessened as a favorite but in fact is more and more relevant to my mind and soul. Many people creatively return over and over again to Edgar Allen Poe for a good reason. Being too specific with the supernatural is fun and has a place, but as one gets older the uncertainty and real life horrors become more and more real. As long as there are a people who still have a sense of the tragic and of the classics of the West, the gothic tradition will always hold a power. This may become extinct over the next century, what is confused as darkness may be actually the last ember of a dying civilization.

The Raven (1935)

Starring Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff

   Once again, like The Black Cat, this is a film whose inspiration is 'suggested by the Edgar Allen Poe classic'. In this case the famous Poem 'The Raven'. The movie actually is more relevant to 
Poe than The Black Cat in that it is influenced explicitly by Poe.

Lugosi plays a brilliant and deranged doctor who is such an aficionado of Poe that he has built a simulated dungeon under his estate and has a stuffed Raven in his study (I want a study like that, even if I live in a trailer I will make a faux one) whose shadow ominously projects itself on the wall.

He saves the life of a beautiful woman, whose father is the local judge. But then his obsession with her causes the Judge to tell Lugosi to stay away from her. I understand the sentiment, but to say it is the height of ingratitude is enough to almost make Lugosi justified in this. He swears revenge and then decides to get some help in the form of escaped criminal Boris Karloff. Karloff wants him to change his face to avoid detection from the authorities. Lugosi changes his face alright(Yuck!) and soon uses him as a pawn to put Poe's imaginary devices from his stories into actual use on those who wronged him!

The movie has alot of really nice touches. A dark and stormy night. A dungeon with a pit and a pendulum. A room with walls that crush its victims and even a room that goes up and down like an elevator. Lugosi reciting Poe and near the end crying "Poe is Avenged!!!" with his accent is
classic horror perfection. Karloff's character is basically the inspiration for a certain Batman villain we all know (he likes to flip a coin) and the scene where he sees the 'new face' Lugosi 
gave him is quite shocking. Lugosi is absolutely batshit insane in this, smiling like a true madman. Once again the early horror film era is a huge influence on Batman's imagery, where I to ever write Batman, the gothic horror element would predominate..not gritty modern serial killer or alt timelines with vampires. 

Once again the 'heroes' are zeros and other than the quite attractive heroine (who does interpretive dance based on Poe!), I would have preferred Lugosi finished them off but hey, crime does not pay! There is a nice humorous touch at the end with an older couple showing what they are doing while the others are fighting for their lives.

While the consensus is that The Black Cat is superior, I enjoy The Raven equally.


The Raven (1964)
Directed by Roger Corman, written by Richard Matheson
Starring Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Boris Karloff and a young punk ass Jack Nicholson.

Once again the connection to Poe is a wraparound piece with Vince reciting the classic poem and then realizing the Raven he sees is actually talking to him..and the bird is a real jerk! Roger Corman and Richard Matheson come through again with an unlikely Poe adaption. After all the grim tales of madness and torture, we get something lighter to digest.

This film is essentially a supernatural comedy with renaissance era sorcerers fighting each other.
The Raven turns out to be a sorcerer (lorre) defeated by an evil one(karloff) and turned into a bird. Vince helps him and then discovers his late former love (Lenore, duh) is a prisoner and is compelled to confront him. Also tagging along is Lorre's simple minded son, a young Jack Nicholson. Of course Nicholson was the son of one of the AIP producers..


This is a fun film and the old timers are amazing. A dying Peter Lorre looks like hell but gives it his all as possibly the most obnoxious character in a move ever, drinking whatever alcohol he can get his hands on when not yelling at everyone and trying to pick fights. Vincent plays a slightly fey younger sorcerer who seems like a wimp but actually is quite powerful when his daughter is threatened. Karloff is a charming old wizard who is quite sinister (but as it turns out a bit henpecked!). Seeing a young Jack Nicholson in the midst of these old masters is surreal in its self and he actually does a great job. I am not a fan of Nicholson but even his constant evil and intense psycho persona has yielded some good results like The Shining.

Also well done is the battle at the end. A very impressive use of lights, animation and matte shots to create a surreal, clever and comical battle between Price and Karloff. All the crazy hong kong movies of the 80's and 90's had to have been influenced by this.(A scene in John Carpenter's
classic Big Trouble in Little China is obviously inspired by this scene).

Also a mention has to be given to late Richard Matheson. This man wrote so many stories, novels and screenplays that influenced modern horror, sci fi, thrillers, etc. He was truly one of the most talented and imaginative writers who ever existed, straddling the mid 20th century when many things once thought fantastical were coming true. His ability to deal with the human element, of how mankind would deal and adapt to all sorts of situations is one of his strengths.

Once again, all hail the masters! The dark themes of their work may dialectically light the way into the new coming dark age, to fight against destiny and fate itself!


Also, here is a great pre Code 50's horror comic style pic from :iconj-cole:!
Bark at the moon by J-Cole

Now I feel the Halloween spirit!

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:iconabelmvada:
AbelMvada Featured By Owner 18 hours ago   Digital Artist
Thanks for the fav + happy Halloween
Muah ha ha ha ha! fiery evil laugh 
Reply
:iconizzy68:
izzy68 Featured By Owner 21 hours ago
thank you
Reply
:iconilmarinenkowal:
IlmarinenKowal Featured By Owner 2 days ago
Thanks for the fave! :D
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:iconchestrockwell69:
chestrockwell69 Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
thanks:)
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:icontommywolfie:
TommyWolfie Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks for the faves, man!
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:icongrimjest:
Grimjest Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you.
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:icondamiandraco:
DamianDraco Featured By Owner 5 days ago
Where is Halloween Headache pg 20?
Reply
:iconsingle-leg:
single-leg Featured By Owner 3 days ago
Lost to time, my friend..
Reply
:iconchestrockwell69:
chestrockwell69 Featured By Owner 5 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
thanks:)
Reply
:icongrimjest:
Grimjest Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you. :)
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